Whistler is coming: ‘Canada’s coolest film fest’ announces first titles for 2018

Whistler is coming: ‘Canada’s coolest film fest’ announces first titles for 2018

We’re only a couple of weeks into pumpkin spice season, but Whistler Film Festival already has us pining for snow, ice, and spiked egg nog.

WFF proved once again why it holds the title of Canada’s coolest film festival last week when it named six of the feature films that will screen at its 2018 edition, which takes place November 28 to December 2 at venues around Whistler Village.

The six films are all Can-con; there’s a BC premiere, three Western Canadian premieres, one Canadian premiere, and one helluva world premiere (an appropriate description, considering the film’s title).  

Here’s a rundown of the six films, courtesy of WFF’s press release: 

AN AUDIENCE OF CHAIRS
In the latest from Relative Happiness director Deanne Foley, a concert pianist on a rural retreat deals with mental health issues and how they may affect her two children. A deeply moving story of artistic talent, motherly love, and psychological imbalance all leading up to an emotionally shattering resolution. 

FALLS AROUND HER (2018, Canada, Western Canadian Premiere)
WFF Alumnus Tantoo Cardinal gives the performance of her career as a First Nations singer who returns to the reserve to rekindle her creative batteries and extricate herself from an abusive relationship. Darlene Naponse’s film is a beautiful depiction of how the land and community can help heal the soul.

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FUCK YOU ALL - THE UWE BOLL STORY (2018, Canada, World Premiere)
Directed by Sean Patrick Shaul, this no-holds-barred, warts and all documentary features one of BC’s most controversial filmmakers, Uwe Boll. Considered by some to be the world’s worst director, the feisty but now retired film entrepreneur – who once publicly boxed a number of film critics who did not like his movies – is still refusing to take guff from any of his detractors.

HUGH HEFNER’S AFTER DARK: SPEAKING OUT IN AMERICA (2018, Canada, Canadian Premiere)
Academy Award winning Brigitte Berman’s follow-up to 2009’s Hugh Hefner: Playboy, Activist, and Rebel focuses on the treasure trove of archival footage derived from Playboy’s two groundbreaking late night syndicated TV series (Playboy’s Penthouse and Playboy After Dark) and features unforgettable performances by Sammy Davis Jr., Sarah Vaughan, Nina Simone, Lenny Bruce, and Smokey Robinson, among many others.

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MAN RUNNING (2018, Canada, BC Premiere)
Director Gary Burns, who is arguably one of Western Canada’s most important filmmakers ever since his breakout film Waydowntown, sets his new film during a running marathon in the Kananaskis region. A doctor in questionable health considers his life and the decisions he made in the area of assisted suicide. An existential trek through the Rockies.

THE GREAT DARKENED DAYS (2018, Canada, Western Canadian Premiere)
From director Maxime Giroux, winner of WFF’s Borsos Competition for Best Canadian Feature for 2014’s Felix et Meira, comes an exciting road movie about a Chaplinesque vagabond who walks and hitchhikes across a sometimes bleak rural American landscape, while learning that it is not safe for him to return home to Quebec.

Additional titles will be announced on September 19 at WFF’s Almost WFF: Countdown Benefit at the Big Rock Urban Brewery in Vancouver.

WFF will take the opportunity to celebrate the accomplishments of five industry insiders: UBCP/ACTRA (Industry Impact Award); Marie Clements (BC Woman on Top Award); Amber Ripley (BC Creates Award); Lawrence Le Lam (WFF Talent to Watch); and Angie Nolan (Industry Toast).

For tickets to Almost WFF: Countdown Benefit, as well as festival passes, visit www.whistlerfilmfestival.com/tickets.

Pictured above: A still from ‘An Audience of Chairs’

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